Professor of the Month: Jane Bailey

Each month, we feature a professor from the Faculty who supports and contributes to feminist legal thought. Jane Bailey Full Professor Interviewed by: Ida Mahmoudi IM: What was your first job ever? JB: My first job ever?! My first job ever…my parents loved to renovate houses and they employed me in the summer to paint.Continue reading “Professor of the Month: Jane Bailey”

The Complications of Consent in Pre-Existing Relationships

Laura Thistle JD Candidate, 2020     Sexual assault cases cause controversy and tension for the Canadian justice system. The common argument is that the system does not provide justice for victims of sexual assault. The real challenge lies in understanding the circumstances surrounding the crime of sexual assault – namely, how often the crime is committedContinue reading “The Complications of Consent in Pre-Existing Relationships”

Issues Surrounding Surrogacy: A Call for Repairs in the Legal Environment

Maja Petrovic JD Candidate, 2019 The November 2016 Shirley Greenberg lecture, Reproductive Labour: Reflections on the Law and Policy of Surrogacy, addressed a major issue in property law, namely surrogacy and proprietary interests within the body. The lecture highlighted two key concerns in relation to surrogacy: bodily exploitation and commodification. The speakers of the panel,Continue reading “Issues Surrounding Surrogacy: A Call for Repairs in the Legal Environment”

Water: Life Giving, Spirit Fulfilling

Victoria Kayal JD Candidate, 2019 Western culture recognises water as necessary for physical survival; its value is tied to its physiological benefits. Water in many Indigenous cultures[1] holds additional cultural and spiritual significance.[2] Last year I was given the opportunity to attend a listening circle with four Indigenous women concerning the role that water playsContinue reading “Water: Life Giving, Spirit Fulfilling”

Professor of the Month: Angela Cameron

Each month, we feature a professor from the Faculty who supports and contributes to feminist legal thought. Angela Cameron Associate Professor Shirley Greenberg Chair Interviewed by: Ashley Seely AS: We know where you are now, so would you be able to tell us where you started? What was your first job? AC: When I wasContinue reading “Professor of the Month: Angela Cameron”

Gendered Robots and the Devaluation of Gendered Labour

Christina Clemente JD Candidate, 2019 In the final scene of The Stepford Wives (1975), a robotic replica of the main character, Joanna, is seen eerily approaching the human Joanna. The robot holds a stocking stretched between both hands, and although not shown, it is clear to the audience that the robot will strangle human JoannaContinue reading “Gendered Robots and the Devaluation of Gendered Labour”

How Many Walls Must be Torn Down Before the Ceiling Can Fall?: A Feminist Overview of ‘Copyleft’ Counter Cultures in Canada

Rebecca De Sanctis JD Candidate, 2019 “We are all equal, but some of us are more equal than others…” – George Orwell, Animal Farm. Orwellian politics can be used to understand the intersections between intellectual property, copyright protections, ‘copyleft’ counter cultures, and feminism in Canada. In theory, the ‘copyleft’ movement emerged as an inclusive anti-capitalistContinue reading “How Many Walls Must be Torn Down Before the Ceiling Can Fall?: A Feminist Overview of ‘Copyleft’ Counter Cultures in Canada”

Roses Are Red, Cyborgs Are Dead: Analyzing the Relevance of Haraway’s “Cyborg” in 2017

Ida Mahmoudi JD Candidate, 2019 I said it – it might be time to carefully store Haraway’s “Cyborg Manifesto” in our grandmothers’ treasure chests and keep it there. The piece is peppered with generalized notions of identity performance and a hint of techno-solutionism. In an effort to stray away from a homogenous sense of “womanhood,”Continue reading “Roses Are Red, Cyborgs Are Dead: Analyzing the Relevance of Haraway’s “Cyborg” in 2017”

The State of Retention: Keeping Women in the Law

Vanessa Carment JD Candidate, 2019 Women are consistently entering the legal profession at higher rates than men, but the retention of women in the profession remains far lower than that of their male counterparts.[1] Among factors like sexual harassment and an “old boy’s club” mentality, retention of women in law often comes down to aContinue reading “The State of Retention: Keeping Women in the Law”